Storytime, Friday, May 29: Welcome to Country

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Storytime, Friday, May 29: Welcome to Country

[Music playing] Emma: G’day everyone and welcome to Storytime from the State Library of Victoria Today, we are bringing our beautiful Pauline Gandel Children’s Quarter to you at home. My name is Emma and I’m so excited to be sharing some songs, rhymes and a story with you today. Before we begin though, I would love to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land in which we’re holding our story time today and I pay my respects to their Elders past, present and emerging. So, to kick off let’s get ready to say hello to everyone Hello! Can you waive your right hand? Hello. Can you wave your left hand. Hello! Let’s wave both hands. Hi! Let’s give this song a go. On the count of three. It’s called, you probably know it by now, the ‘Hello Song’, ready? 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Hi, hello and how are you? How are you? How are you? Hi, hello and how are you? How are you today? [Stops singing] Oh, great job! Give yourself a big clap. Should we do that one more time? Yeah, let’s go. 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Hi, hello and how are you? How are you? How are you? Hi, hello and how are you? How are you today? [Stops singing] Oh! Awesome job. Well done! Now, this next song has a few different Australian animals in it and it’s to the tune of ‘Frère Jacques’. Our first animal, we’re going to put our hands together like this and make a barramundi Good barramundi, very good. Our next animal we’re going to take our hand and put it on top of our hand to make a crest and we are going to be cockatoo, Squawk, squawk Next up, oh it’s a very sleepy animal and this one is the cuddly koala. Can you give yourself a cuddle? Good job. And our very last one is an animal that likes to hop and bounce around everywhere, kangaroo! So we have barramundi, cockatoo, cuddly koala and kangaroo. So let’s give it a go to the tune of ‘Frère Jacques’ Ready? 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Barramundi, barramundi. Cockatoo, cockatoo Cuddly Koala, cuddly koala. Kangaroo, kangaroo. [Stops singing] Ah, some good bouncing hopefully in your lounge room. Let’s do that one more time, ready? Let’s get our barramundi swimming. 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Barramundi, barramundi. Cockatoo, cockatoo. Cuddly koala, cuddly koala. Kangaroo, kangaroo. [Stops singing] Oh, good job bouncing! So many different animals in that one too. Now, this next song is about another kind of native Australian bird and it’s known as the laughing bird. Do you know what it might be? It makes a sound like this: ‘uuh-aah’. Do you know what it might be? Have you guessed it? A kookaburra. Makes a very funny noise, doesn’t it? Can you try it with me? You have to get your wings ready. 1-2-3 ‘Uuh-aah, yuh-aah’. Such a funny silly sound. Well this song is called ‘Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree’ and if you can clap along with me that would be lovely. And at the very end we’re going to do our best laughing Kookaburra impression. Ready? 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree Merry merry king of the bush is he Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, Kookaburra gay your life must be. Kookaburras are you ready? Uuh-aah, uuh-aah’ [Stops singing] Very good! I wonder what the kookaburra find so funny. Let’s do it one more

time. 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree, Merry merry king of the bush is he Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, Kookaburra, Gay your life must be! [Stops singing] Are we ready little Kookaburras? ‘Uuh-aah’ uuh-aah’ Someone must have said a very funny joke Well done everyone! Give yourself a clap Now it’s time for one of my favourite stories here at the State Library of Victoria. This story today that we’re reading is called: ‘Welcome to Country’ and it is written by ‘Aunty Joy Murphy’ and it is beautifully illustrated by ‘Lisa Kennedy’ and our story today is published by ‘Black Dog Books’ Oh, look at the beautiful swirls Wominjeka, Wurundjeri, balluk yearmenn koondee bik. Welcome to the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri people. Look at the beautiful river that runs through here and the trees growing in the land. Our ancestors left their mark on the land for us to follow in their footsteps. We have a presence on this earth through the spirits of our ancestors. We respectfully acknowledge our Elders and the community of this land and all Elders and communities of this continent and neighbouring islands. We thank them for their courage, strength, integrity and values. Look at the beautiful stars here Can you see, I can spot an emu. Can you make an emu with your arm? And what’s this? Looks like a kangaroo We the Wurundjery are the Manna Gun People- Wurun the River White Gum and Djeri, the grub that lives in the tree Have you ever spotted the little grubs that live in the tree? They almost look like little caterpillars eating away at the bark Bunjil the eagle is our creator spirit. Bunjil created man, woman, and child from the land. Can you put your arms out wide and soar the skies like bunch of the eagle? woosh, woosh, woosh Bunjil created the birds, the animals, the mountains and the rivers. Can we make a big mountain with our arms and put them up high up in the sky like a mountain. Real high. And for the rivers, can we make our arms flow with the water, splish, splash, splish, splash, following the current. Bunjil created all things natural from the land bunjil watches over the indelible footprints of our ancestors on this land Can see some beautiful animals. You might spot some even when you go walking around in the bush. We invite you to take a leaf from the branches of the white river gum If you accept the leaf and we hope you do, it means you are welcome to everything From the tops of the trees, to the roots of the earth. Can you feel the ground beneath your palms and feel the roots of the earth. But you must only take from this land what you can give back We thank you for you have now joined with us to pay respects to the spirit of our ancestors who have nurtured this land for thousands and thousands of years, taking care of the land, its animals and its people too. We are part of the land and the land is a part of us We feel the roots of this land beneath

the soles of our bare feet. Can you feel the floor under your feet. Feel the earth This is where we come from. Our language is the Wolwurrung Ngulu. Wominjeka, Wurundjeri, balluk yearmenn koondee bik. Welcome to the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri people. Everyone welcome to Country. I love that story so much and the pictures in this book are beautiful Every time we read it we always find something new. So maybe either you might have a copy of it at home or you can borrow it from your library too. But hopefully you enjoyed it today as well Now, I think it’s time for us to do a song where we have to stand up. Let’s stand up tall and stretch side to side. I think it’s time now for us to do a song about a farmer. Do you know what this song might be? Old MacDonald, you’re right We’re going to do those some Australian animals in this next song. So, what if we do cockatoo to start with. Are we ready? 1-2-3 Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O. And on that farm he had a cockatoo, E-I-E-I-O. With a ‘squawk-squawk’ here and ‘squawk-squawk’ there. Here a ‘squawk’, there a ‘squawk’. Everywhere a ‘squawk- squawk’. Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O. And on that farm he had a… kangaroo, E-I-E-I-O. Are you ready? With a ‘bounce-bounce’ here and a ‘bounce-bounce’ there. Here a bounce There a bounce. Everywhere a ‘bounce-bounce’. bounce Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O And on that farm he had a… crocodile, E-I-E-I-O With a ‘snap-snap’ here and a ‘snap- snap there. Here a snap. There a snap Everywhere a ‘snap-snap’ Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O. And on that farm he had a koala, a very sleepy koala, ready? E-I-E-I-O. With a ‘ahhhh-hhaaaaaa’ here and a ‘ahhhh-hhaaaaaa’ there Here ‘ahhhh-hhaaaaaa’. There a ‘ahhhh-hhaaaaaa’. There a ‘ahhhh-hhaaaaaa’ Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O [Stops singing] Ah, good job everyone. Well done from home Now I think it’s time for us to sit back down. Let’s sit back down for this one And, we are going to do a song now about some ducks. Are you ready? Not one duck, not two ducks, not three ducks or four ducks but five little ducks. Can you wiggle your five little ducks with me? one, two, three, four, five and with the other hand we’re going to make a big beak mother duck that goes: ‘quack- quack- quack- quack- quack- quack’. So this song is called ‘Five Little Ducks’. Let’s join in together now. 1-2-3. [begin singing] Five little ducks went out one day. Over the hills and far away. Mother duck said: ‘quack- quack- quack- quack’. But only four little ducks came back Four little ducks went out one day. Over the hills and far away. Mother duck said: ‘quack- quack- quack- quack’. But only three little ducks came back. Three little ducks went out one day. Over the hills and far away. Mother duck said: ‘quack- quack- quack- quack’. But only two little ducks came back. Two little ducks went

out one day. Over the hills and far away Mother duck said: ‘quack- quack- quack- quack But only one little duck came back. One little duck went out one day. Over the hills and far away. Mother duck said: ‘quack- quack- quack- quack’. And all of the five little ducks came back. [Stops singing] They all came back home to mama duck ‘Quack-quack-quack’ ‘Quack-quack-quack’. That had a good ending to that song. Everyone was reunited to have a cuddle. So now it’s time for another little rhyme and this one is a tickle rhyme. So, I’m gonna need some help from my friend Teddy for this one. In our story ‘Welcome to Country’, we had the little Jerry Grub, didn’t we? They like to live in the trees. So this little rhyme is called ‘Some Jerry’. And what we’re going to do is whatever I do on Teddy’s back you might have a friend or maybe your mom or dad or a brother or sister doing your back or maybe you do it to them. So copy me, ready? 1-2-3 Some Jerry are long. Some Jerry are short Some Jerry are wide. Some Jerry are thin Some Jerry are straight and some Jerry are wiggly. But the Jerry I like the most goes: ‘munch, munch, munch, munch, munch, munch. They love to eat the bark. Should we do it one more time? This time maybe see if you can do it to someone else Ready? 1-2-3 Some Jerry are long. Some Jerry are short. Some Jerry are short Jerry are wide, and some Jerry are thin Some Jerry are straight and some Jerry are wiggly. But the Jerry I like the most goes: ‘munch, munch, munch, munch, munch, munch Good tickles, great tickles everyone Well, now I think it’s time for us to get our stars twinkling. So, I’m gonna throw you some stars. Can you catch them, ready? 1-2-3, catch. Did you get them? Let me throw another bunch. Ready? 1-2-3 and catch those stars! Good job! And I’ve got some here too but like to twinkle in the sky. So let’s join in now together to sing ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ 1-2-3. [Begins singing] Twinkle, twinkle little star. How I wonder what you are. Up above the world so high. Like a diamond in the sky. Twinkle, twinkle little star. How I wonder what you are. [Stops singing] Look t these lovely stars. You always do such a good job singing ‘Twinkle Twinkle’. Let’s do it one more time. Ready? 1-2-3 Twinkle, twinkle little star. How I wonder what you are. Up above the world so high Like a diamond in the sky. Twinkle, twinkle little star. How I wonder what you are. [Stops singing] Such a lovely song. Well, that’s all we’ve got time for today everyone. But I hope you’ve had lots of fun and maybe some of the songs we shared today you might enjoy throughout the rest of the day maybe even the week. You can maybe teach other people some new songs too. So now it’s time for our very last song. It’s very similar to how we started Storytime today. Where we get our hands and we wave. Can you wave with me? Great job! This time we’re going to wave goodbye. So let’s join in for this last one. [Begins singing] 1-2-3 Goodbye, goodbye. We’ll see you soon, see

you soon, see you soon. Goodbye, goodbye we’ll see you soon. On another day. [Stops singing] Can we do that one more time? ok. 1-2-3 [Begins singing] Goodbye, goodbye we’ll see you soon, see you soon, see you soon. Goodbye, goodbye we’ll see you soon. On another day. [Stops singing] Thanks for coming along to Storytime everyone And we hope that you have a magical day See you next time