Howards End (Chapter 01) [AudioBook]

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Howards End (Chapter 01) [AudioBook]

chapter one of Howards End this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by elizabeth klett Howards End by E M Forster chapter one one may as well begin with Helens letters to her sister Howards End Tuesday dearest Meg it isn’t going to be what we expected it is old and little and altogether delightful redbrick we can scarcely pack in as it is and the dear knows what will happen when Paul younger son arrives tomorrow from Hall you go right or left into dining room a drawing-room Hall itself is practically a room you open another door in it and there are the stairs going up in a sort of tunnel to the first floor three bedrooms in a row there and three attics in a row above that isn’t all the house really but it’s all that one notices nine windows as you look up from the front garden then there’s a very big witch elm to the left as you look up leaning a little over the house and standing on the boundary between the garden and meadow I quite love that tree already also Audrey Elms Oaks no nastier than ordinary Oaks pear trees apple trees and a vine no silver birches though however I must get on to my host and hostess I only wanted to show that it isn’t the least what we expected why did we settle that their house would be all gables and wiggles and their garden all gamboge colored paths i believe simply because we associate them with expensive hotels mrs. wilcox traveling in beautiful dresses down long corridors mr. wilcox bullying porters etc we females are that unjust I shall be back Saturday will let you know train later they are as angry as I am that you did not come to really Tibby is too tiresome he starts a new mortal disease every month how could he have got hay fever in London and even if he could it seems hard that you should give up a visit to hear a schoolboy sneeze tell him that Charles Wilcox the son who is here has hay fever too but he’s brave and gets quite cross when we inquire after it men like the Wilcoxes would do Tibby a power of good but you won’t agree and I’d better change the subject this long letter is because I’m writing before breakfast oh the beautiful vine leaves the house is covered with a vine I looked out earlier and mrs. Wilcox was already in the garden she evidently loves it no wonder she sometimes looks tired she was watching the large red poppies come out then she walked off the lawn to the meadow whose corner to the right I can just see trail trail went her long dress over the sopping grass and she came back with her hands full of the hay that was cut yesterday I suppose for rabbits or something as she kept on smelling it the air here is delicious later on I heard the noise of croquet balls and looked out again and it was Charles Wilcox practising they are keen on all games presently he started sneezing and had to stop then I hear more clicking and it is mr. Wilcox practising and then a tishoo a tishoo he has to stop too then Evie comes out and does some calisthenic exercises on a machine that is tacked onto a green gauge tree they put everything to use and then she says a tissue and in she goes and finally mrs. Wilcox reappears trail trail still smelling hey and looking at the flowers I inflict all this on you because once you said that life is sometimes life and sometimes only a drama and one must learn to distinguish t’other from which and up to now I have always put that down as Meg’s clever nonsense but this morning it really does seem not life but a play and it did amuse me enormous ly to watch the double

use now mrs. Wilcox has come in I am going to wear omission last night mrs Wilcox Warren permission and evey omission so it isn’t exactly a go-as-you-please place and if you shot your eyes it still seems the wiggly hotel that we expected not if you open them the dog roses are too sweet there is a great hedge of them over the lawn magnificently tall so that they fall down in Garland’s and nice and thin at the bottom so that you can see ducks through a tender cow these belong to the farm which is the only house near us there goes the breakfast gong much love modified love to Tibby love to Aunt juley how good of her to come and keep you company but what a bore burn this will write again Thursday Helen Howards End Friday dearest Meg I am having a glorious time I like them all mrs Wilcox if quieter than in Germany is sweeter than ever and I never saw anything like her steady unselfishness and the best of it is that the others do not take advantage of her they are the very happiest jolliest family that you can imagine I do you really feel that we are making friends the fun of it is that they think me a noodle and say so at least mr. Wilcox does and when that happens and one doesn’t mind it’s a pretty short test isn’t it he says the most horrid things about women’s suffrage so nicely and when I said I believed in equality he just folded his arms and gave me such a set down as I’ve never had meg shall be ever learned to talk less I never felt so ashamed of myself in my life I couldn’t point to a time when men had been equal nor even to a time when the wish to be equal had made them happier in other ways I couldn’t say a word I had just picked up the notion that equality is good from some book probably from poetry or you anyhow it’s been knocked into pieces and like all people who are really strong mr. Wilcox did it without hurting me on the other hand I laugh at them for catching hay fever we live like Fighting and Charles takes us out every day in the motor a tomb with trees in it a hermits house a wonderful road that was made by the kings of Mercia tennis a cricket match bridge and at night we squeeze up in this lovely house the whole clans here now it’s like a rabbit warren evey is a deer they want me to stop over sunday I suppose it won’t matter if I do marvelous weather and the views marvelous views westward to the high ground thank you for your letter burn this your affectionate Helen Howards End Sunday dearest dearest Meg I do not know what she will say Paul and I are in love the youngest son who only came here Wednesday end of chapter one you